Africa Poised To Build Dependent Economies And Avoid Charity – President Of Ghana At UN

President of Ghana, Mr Nana Akufo-Addo has disclosed that GGhana nor Africa wanted to be scars on anybody’s conscience. I said we want to build economies that are not dependent on charity and handouts.

The President made the disclosure in his speech at the UN 76th assembly in America that, ” Long and bitter experiences have taught us that, no matter how generous the charity, we would remain poor. Between 2017 to 2020, Ghana recorded an average growth rate of 7%, amongst the highest in the world.

“Ghana nor Africa wanted to be scars on anybody’s conscience. I said we want to build economies that are not dependent on charity and handouts, because long and bitter experiences have taught us that, no matter how generous the charity, we would remain poor. Between 2017 to 2020, Ghana recorded an average growth rate of 7%, amongst the highest in the world.” He said.

His speech was tagged with the theme, ” Building resilience through hope to recover from COVID-19, rebuild sustainability, respond to the needs of the planet, respect the rights of the people and revitalize the United Nations.

” In 2020, when the global economy and sub-Saharan Africa’s contracted by 3.5% and 2.1%, respectively, Ghana was one of the few countries that produced a positive growth rate. This is a testament to our determination to build a Ghana Beyond Aid.

“One year on, although infection rates and deaths are relatively lower in the Region, the virus’s impact on economies and livelihoods has been damaging. The latest numbers from the African Development Bank indicate that African economies, which contracted by 2.1% in 2020, are yet to return to pre-pandemic levels.

“More than thirty million Africans fell into extreme poverty in 2020, and nearly forty million could do so in 2021.

“The social impact has been devastating; over one hundred and three million African jobs have been lost. Women, who account for forty percent (40%) of total employment, have been most hard hit.

“Admitting the African Union to an expanded G21 would have the same galvanising effect within Africa that the EU’s participation in the G20 has within Europe, strengthening policy co-ordination and coherence across the fifty-four (54) African economies. With the African Union at the table, the group suddenly would have representation for fifty-four (54) more countries, 1.3 billion more people, and $2.3 trillion more output. This extraordinary increase in representation will add just one seat to the table, and about ten minutes to the discussion. However, it will redefine global policy co-ordination to enable a more prosperous, inclusive and sustainable world to emerge.

“Fourthly, we, in Africa, are as committed as any to the fight against Climate Change. We believe, however, that the fight is better-advanced if we are able to maintain the crucial balance between economic, political and environmental imperatives – positions that we will be articulating in Glasgow, at the COP 26 Conference, which should form part of the new Global Compact. Lastly, now more than ever, we must defend democracy, constitutional rule and human rights in the world. In the last twenty-four (24) months, we have witnessed assaults on democracy around the world, sometimes even in developed countries where we had assumed that a consensus on the democratic form of governance had been established. Mr. President, in West Africa, recent events in Mali and Guinea have undermined democratic governance in our Region.

“ECOWAS, the regional body whose Authority I have the honour to be the current Chair, is unreservedly committed to maintaining democratic governance in the ECOWAS Community. That is why both Guinea and Mali, foundation members of the Community, have been suspended from its organisation, 6 pending the restoration of democratic governance. We welcome the support of the United Nations for the measures taken. ECOWAS has given Guinea six (6) months to do so, and requested the immediate release of President Alpha Conde. On my visit to Conakry last Friday, the military leaders indicated their willingness to see to his imminent release, and it is our hope that they will keep to their word.

“The Authority has also made it clear to the military government in Mali, that it is not prepared to negotiate an extension to the February deadline for the holding of democratic elections, as the essential steps to be taken can, with political will, be effected within the ECOWAS-sanctioned timetable. It is better that a government, with a democratic mandate, be in place as soon as possible, to implement the necessary reforms for the future stability and growth of Mali, thereby enhancing capacity for the allimportant fight against terrorism in Mali and in the wider Sahel.

“We, in Ghana, highly resolve that we will continue to defend democracy and constitutional rule, and uphold human rights. We shall work to strengthen the institutions that support democracy in our country and in our Region. We shall continue to support the United Nations and other international organisations to help remind us that, indeed, no man is an island, entire of itself. I thank you for your attention.” Said President Nana Akufo-Addo.

 

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